coffeepeople
coffeepeople:

Artificial Stars by zungzwang on Flickr.

Thank you for this photo. It sums up how I feel at the moment in terms of my career as an Early Childhood Educator. Standing in a busy place with no one who gets it.
After recently attending a workshop I realized that a lot of people have no idea what they are talking about.  The workshop based on emergent curriculum was being presented by two women. One woman would work in the field for some time, and the other, younger recently graduated.  The second definitely seemed to be more comfortable taking over the presentation.  She then proceeded to inform a room full of working Early Childhood Educators how their challenges, their needs and their methods were all in all wrong. 
How is that supposed to be helpful? How is that supposed to encourage Educators to move toward this style of teaching? 
To tell a room full of Educators, that teacher’s don’t respect us because we don’t  make them. Not because they don’t value our methods, or our jobs. Not that teachers generally feel we are not as qualified as they are. 
I left this workshop feeling like I loss a little bit of my intelligence. I loss more than what I came in with.
Not only did she not provide any suggestions, or any ideas on how to encourage a better relationship with schools, she made a room full of women feel more inadequate at their jobs then before. 
I just wish someone local would step up in this area and provide Early Childhood Educators with a better sense of community. Instead of our centre against your centre, work together to better how we are teaching our students.
One can dream…

coffeepeople:

Artificial Stars by zungzwang on Flickr.

Thank you for this photo. It sums up how I feel at the moment in terms of my career as an Early Childhood Educator. Standing in a busy place with no one who gets it.

After recently attending a workshop I realized that a lot of people have no idea what they are talking about.  The workshop based on emergent curriculum was being presented by two women. One woman would work in the field for some time, and the other, younger recently graduated.  The second definitely seemed to be more comfortable taking over the presentation.  She then proceeded to inform a room full of working Early Childhood Educators how their challenges, their needs and their methods were all in all wrong. 

How is that supposed to be helpful? How is that supposed to encourage Educators to move toward this style of teaching? 

To tell a room full of Educators, that teacher’s don’t respect us because we don’t  make them. Not because they don’t value our methods, or our jobs. Not that teachers generally feel we are not as qualified as they are. 

I left this workshop feeling like I loss a little bit of my intelligence. I loss more than what I came in with.

Not only did she not provide any suggestions, or any ideas on how to encourage a better relationship with schools, she made a room full of women feel more inadequate at their jobs then before. 

I just wish someone local would step up in this area and provide Early Childhood Educators with a better sense of community. Instead of our centre against your centre, work together to better how we are teaching our students.

One can dream…